Great Britain - 1791

½ Penny Token (D & H 17 - Yorkshire, Hull)
Obverse - Great Britain  - 1791 Reverse - Great Britain - 1791
Obverse - Laureated equestrian figure of King William III in a toga and bearing a truncheon in his right hand.
Legend: GULIELMUS TERTIUS REX. with MDCLXXXIX in the exergue.
Reverse - Arms of the town of Hull. (Azure [improperly argent on the token], three ducal coronets in pale, or.) This tincture could scarcely be shown on the token. The shield is between crossed oak sprigs bearing acorns.
Legend: HULL HALFPENNY 1791
Edge:- PAYABLE AT THE WAREHOUSE OF IONATHAN GARTON & CO .x.
Diesinker, Hancock; manufacturer, Hancock. Five tons struck. Common. The error in the heraldic tincture is unfortunate, but a well executed and massive token.
 
Comments. Garton and Shackles were linen drapers in the Market Place in Hull.
 
   The obverse is taken from the equestrian statue of William III standing near the south end of the Market Place. It was erected by public subscription in 1734, and was at first in a large square, but this took up too much space, and it was replaced by a close railing with four lamps placed around it. The statue was executed by Scheemaker. The pedestal bears the inscription: "This statue was erected in the year 1734 to the memory of King William III, our great deliverer."
 
   The reverse presents the Arms of the town, originally known as Wyke-upon-Hull, and subsequently Kingstown, or Kingston-upon-Hull: incorporated by Edward I, and made a county of itself by Henry VI.
 
   There are trifling variations in the dies used for this token. There are also several mules.
Commercial Coins 1787-1804., pp. 204-205
 
D & H 17 - William III
O: An equestrian statue of William III. GULIELMUS TERTIUS REX. Ex: MDCLXXXIX.
R: Shield of arms between sprigs of oak, with seven acorns to the right hand, and eight to the left. HULL HALFPENNY. The date 1791 above the shield.
E:
A. 18
PAYABLE AT THE WAREHOUSE OF IONATHAN GARTON & CO .X.

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